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Compton College / Academic Programs / Student Equity Program / Integrated Plan

Integrated Plan

The Chancellor's Office has been undergoing an effort to integrate three programs: Basic Skills Initiative (BSI), Student Equity Program (SE), and Student Success and Support Program (SSSP). These programs were selected as a starting point for integrative efforts for two main reasons: 1) all three have the same ultimate goal of increasing student success while closing ach gaps; and 2) there is a strong potential for overlap between and among the programs.  

Student Equity Program:

The Student Equity Program (SE) focus is to ensure equal educational opportunities and to promote student success for all students. As a condition of Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) funding, colleges must maintain a student equity plan. Each college plan develops specific goals/outcomes and actions to address disparities. Education code specifies that, at a minimum, colleges must review and address the following categories of students by gender when looking at disproportionate impact in student equity plans: current or former foster youth, students with disabilities, low-income students, and veterans. Additionally, colleges must have campus-based research on the following ethnic and racial categories: American Indians or Alaskan natives, Asian, native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders, Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, White, some other race, and more than one race.

SE Progress Highlights:

The Student Equity Progress Report Highlights document includes outcomes and comparisons for disproportionately impacted groups at Compton College during the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 years. The Student Equity data is separated into five sections: Access, Course Completion, Basic Skills Completion, Degree and Certificate Completion, and Transfer. All five sections include information on Compton students broken out by gender, ethnicity, economic needs, as well as veteran, disabled and foster status as applicable for affected groups in each section. Each section includes an explanation on methodology as well as a "Summary" and "Next Steps" for the affected groups in each section. A positive percentage difference of at least 1% is the desired outcome in accordance to the 5%, 5-year goal. Negative differences show an increase in the gap from one year to the next.  

Access to education is defined by the "percentage of each population group that is enrolled to the percentage of that group in the adult population within the community served."  This participation rate compares the population enrolled in credit courses within the Compton Center to the population of people living within its service area. The affected groups in this section are veteran and Male students. When comparing the two years of data, we found incremental progress was made in terms of access for male students, but the Veterans' population shows an even greater disparity in community representation vs. college representation. The Student Equity team has set a goal for increased "inreach" to existing Veteran students, as well as increasing collaborations with outside agencies that work with Veterans locally.

Course Completion is the ratio of the number of credit courses that students, by population group, complete compared to the number of courses in which students in that group are enrolled on the census day of the term. The affected groups in this section are African-American, Pacific Islander, foster youth, and students that identified a disability. When comparing the two years of data, course completion rose for all groups, with incremental increases for African American students and students with disabilities. Pacific Islander and Foster Youth students showed the greatest increases in course completion rates. Current Student Equity projects are being assessed to note which interventions have the most beneficial impact for student populations specified in the Student Equity Plan. These projects will be recommended to continue in Fall 2017 and encouraged to submit funding under the approved Integrated Plan when adopted in Winter 2018.

Basic Skills Completion includes first-time students who took their first class in a basic skills sequence (English or math) and subsequently completed the final course within that sequence. These students are tracked for 6 years to see if the outcome was achieved.  A successful outcome in English is indicated by successful completion of a transfer level English course. A successful outcome for math is the successful completion of a transfer level or degree applicable level course. The affected groups in this section are African-American, Pacific Islander, and students that identified a disability. Students in Basic Skills English were able to progress to the final course in the sequence at higher rates starting with the 2009-10 (tracked for six years) cohort. Particular progress was made by impacted groups, including students with disabilities. Data will be presented to Math and English departments for faculty to use in planning and revising their courses, devising additional research questions, and brainstorming possible professional development activities that will promote best practices in teaching diverse learners in pre-college courses.

Degree and Certificate Completion includes students who completed six units, and attempted an English or math course. These students are tracked for six years from their first semester to see if the outcome was achieved.  A successful outcome is the completion of a degree or certificate. The affected groups in this section are African-American and Latino students. Although Latino students showed a slight increase in readiness to complete, overall, results did not show progress in this area.

Student Equity began supporting two projects to assist with degree and certificate completion in the CTE areas, and the results from those efforts will be seen in future data.

Transfer includes students who completed six units, and attempted an English or math course (same as the degree or certificate cohort).  These students are tracked for six years to see if the outcome was achieved.  A successful outcome is the transfer to a Bachelor degree granting institution which is identified through the California Community College Chancellor"s Office. The affected groups in this section are all students (due to poor rates of completion overall), with a particular emphasis on students that identified a disability. Students with identified disabilities saw the greatest progress in terms of reducing achievement gaps for transfer rates, while other groups saw small but positive gains. Latino, African American, and female students still lag behind the overall transfer rate for the college. With a significant increase in degrees and certificates awarded in the 2016-17 year, it is expected that transfer rates will also begin to grow. The college is also streamlining its college tour process, improving publicity and selection, as well as follow-up procedures to ensure that students remain on track to transfer.

Student Equity Progress Report Highlights Spring 2017 (PDF)

2017-18 Integrated Plan (PDF)

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